PSP&G students present their work at the CREATE conference

The CREATE Conference – Celebrating Research Excellence and Artistic Talent at Eastern, will run this Friday afternoon and Saturday morning, April 17-18. Among the 170 students presenting their work are our own political science, philosophy and geography (PSP&G) students: Matthew Hicks, Je’Quana Orr, Harrison McNair and Alexander Zacharie. Come and support them if you can!

 

Additional information and the program can be found at: http://www1.easternct.edu/create/ or click here for the CREATE Program

“Dig Into Democracy” debate, Wednesday April 8

Come to the “Dig Into Democracy” debate Wednesday, April 8, in Room 223 in the Student Center at 7 p.m. This debate will explore the issue of corruption in American government and ways we can fix it. Free Ben and Jerry’s ice cream will be provided. The event is sponsored by Represent ECSU (representecsu@gmail.com; Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/activateeasternct).

 

 

Polisci student organizes event to discuss police brutality and basic rights

By Adjana Bouzi

For the past few years we have, nationally, seen many people killed at the hands of the police due to excessive use of force. On the recent shooting in Ferguson, the question of what should be done has been highly discussed. Certainly, there are different viewpoints on whether the amount of force used by police is excessive or required, but an understanding of each others viewpoint may be the beginning of finding a solution. I have always wanted to help illuminate the facts behind the issue and my senior seminar provided me an opportunity to work with a fellow classmate and set up this event. I believe that this panel has shed light on some of the unfortunate circumstances that has taken place over the years and educated people on what their rights are. The viewpoints of both police enforcement and ordinary people was presented by police officers and those who had an encounter with the police. I really hope that this event will be the beginning of eradicating the trend of police brutality.

Controversial discussion on Lithuania with Nobel Prize winner in Economics Robert Shiller

By Kevin Schaffner, ECSU Polisci Senior

 

On October 16th at The University of Saint Joseph’s Crystal Room I had the honor of attending a discussion between Robert J. Shiller, Ph.D., winner of the 2013 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, and Ambassador of Lithuania Žygimantas Pavilionis, Ph.D. The goal of the event, titled The New Europe, was to discuss the political and economic challenges facing Europe in the wake or Russian advances in the Ukraine.

Expecting a promising night of economic discussion and consequence of Russia’s aggression, the night quickly became a public relations campaign for Lithuania and a night of hearing Dr. Shiller’s uncertain opinions on what Russia ought to do. Deviating from the topic at the beginning of the event, both esteemed candidates traded comments on how great Lithuania is and how bad Putin is. It can be generally agreed on that Putin is not the greatest leader but the already distracted discussion took a turn off the highway when Dr. Shiller and Ambassador Pavilionis started comparing Putin to Adolf Hitler.

The Audience being mostly composed of distinguished members of the West Hartford community did not take lightly to these comments. Being part of an email thread that was meant to discuss the event, the overwhelming topic was about the insensitive comments. One email by James Sodder stated that “(the comment), Putin is worse than Hitler, explicitly devalues the Holocaust”. Another attendee, Havital Miltz commented, “I found the remark about Putin being worse than Hitler inappropriate”, she continued, “West Hartford has a large Jewish population, some of which are Holocaust survivors or descendants”. Though there may be arguable comparisons between the rise of fascist Europe and the consolidation of power by Putin as described in Robert Shiller’s article titled Parallels to 1937 online on Project Syndicate, the presentation of this theory was poorly done.

Much could have been done to present this comparison in a more professional manner, but instead the audience expecting to hear insight on the economic consequences of Putin’s aggression, found themselves hearing unsupported and rather insulting comments for the sake of promoting Lithuania’s anti-Putin agenda.