Pizza and Politics Night – ECSU Professor of Communication and former U.S. diplomat César Beltrán talks on the legacy of Madeleine Albright

 By César Beltrán

During the course of our separate careers Madeleine Albright and I have often crossed paths. My first encounter with her was in the mid-1980s, when I was serving as the U.S. Information Agency Desk Officer for Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia. I had just completed a tumultuous three-year tour in Krakow, Poland, witnessed the rise and fall of the Solidarnosc trade union movement, and received an unprecedented two promotions in the Foreign Service, thanks to what I had just experienced and reported on in Central Europe. At this time, Professor Albright was carrying out research on Solidarnosc, pestering me for a speaker’s grant (AmPart Program) to get into Central Europe, and tutoring two political aspirants, Bill and Hillary Clinton, in matters of international relations at her Georgetown home. For her efforts, Madeleine Albright subsequently would be named by President Clinton as Ambassador to the United Nations and then as Secretary of State, a position she held from 1997 to 2001. Overall, Madeleine Albright’s approach to foreign policy—while not perfect—was well-informed, clearly intelligent, and based on a deep and wide understanding of politics and history, particularly in Europe.

Cesar D. Beltran
Career Counselor (Retired)
Senior Foreign Service
U.S. State Department

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