words Monthly Archives: March 2014

Eastern students attend a highly energized Conservative Conference (CPAC) in Washington, D.C.

By Meaghan McFall-Gorman
Freshmen at Eastern Connecticut State University
English Major and Political Science Minor

This past weekend, from March 6th to 9th, several students from Eastern Conservative-Libertarian Club went to Washington D.C. to participate in the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC). The speakers featured included Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz, Ben Carson, Rand Paul, Governor Chris Christie, Ann Coulter, and Sarah Palin among many others. Many are notable Republican political figures, however the conference itself is not exclusive to people who identify with the Republican party, rather it is meant for those with conservative to libertarian ideologies. The panels held throughout the conference demonstrated the differences of opinion even within the conservative ideology. Panels were held on topics ranging from the legalization of marijuana, Edward Snowden, Gun legislation, economics, possible American involvement in the Ukraine, and women in politics. As a female who identifies as conservative, I greatly enjoyed these women-based and hel panels, because they analyzed the unique state that is being a woman in a party that is condemned for having a “war” against us. The other panels were just as interesting, demonstrating the dichotomy of pot legalization as the new wave of conservatives (my generation) begin to take hold in society. Overall, the experience was extremely eye-opening experience, that has furthered my interest in politics and leaves me waiting until the next political conference I can have an opportunity to attend. I would highly reccomend CPAC to any student, any individual, of any ideology, as it is an intellectually stimulating and awareness-raising event all people should experience.

 

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Pizza and Politics Night – ECSU Professor of Communication and former U.S. diplomat César Beltrán talks on the legacy of Madeleine Albright

 By César Beltrán

During the course of our separate careers Madeleine Albright and I have often crossed paths. My first encounter with her was in the mid-1980s, when I was serving as the U.S. Information Agency Desk Officer for Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia. I had just completed a tumultuous three-year tour in Krakow, Poland, witnessed the rise and fall of the Solidarnosc trade union movement, and received an unprecedented two promotions in the Foreign Service, thanks to what I had just experienced and reported on in Central Europe. At this time, Professor Albright was carrying out research on Solidarnosc, pestering me for a speaker’s grant (AmPart Program) to get into Central Europe, and tutoring two political aspirants, Bill and Hillary Clinton, in matters of international relations at her Georgetown home. For her efforts, Madeleine Albright subsequently would be named by President Clinton as Ambassador to the United Nations and then as Secretary of State, a position she held from 1997 to 2001. Overall, Madeleine Albright’s approach to foreign policy—while not perfect—was well-informed, clearly intelligent, and based on a deep and wide understanding of politics and history, particularly in Europe.

Cesar D. Beltran
Career Counselor (Retired)
Senior Foreign Service
U.S. State Department

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Professor Hope Fitz heads to Romania for a philosophical discussion on Human Knowledge

Hope Fitz will  deliver a paper at the 10th Congress of the International Society of Universal Dialogue, ISUD, in Craiova, Romania, July 4-9, 2014.  The theme of the Congress is “The Human Being: Its Nature and Functions”.  This is a theme that focuses on the human as a species. Hope wrote the theme.  The paper which she will present is entitled: “Human Knowledge from a Human Perspective”.  This paper focuses on the fact that the philosophical belief that humans could have certain knowledge of reality has lost its credence over the centuries.  Also she will argue that what one must consider in seeking understanding, which is necessary for knowledge, are the means to knowledge and the methods of knowing. She will trace the line of means and methods from the Greeks through Kant, and then consider Martin Heidegger’s objection to all mind-dependent theories which he said started with Aristotle and culminated in the philosophy of Kant. Finally, Hope will adumbrate the post deconstructionist thought of Michele Foucault, and introduce the epistemology of discourse.

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