LAUNCHING GERMINA VERIS – AN OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL FOR HISTORY STUDENTS

The Department of History is proud to announce the creation of “Germina Veris,” an online, open access journal dedicated to publishing outstanding papers by senior History students at Eastern Connecticut State University. Each semester students produce original, thought-provoking research in seminars on a variety of topics. Germina Veris – “the buds of spring” – makes this research available to the general public for the first time. Each article is carefully selected by specialists in the field based on the depth of original research, its contribution to existing scholarship, and the scientific rigor of its analysis. Please visit http://www1.easternct.edu/germinaveris/ to see the first issue!

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HISTORY STUDENTS AND FACULTY VISIT ISRAEL, JORDAN AND WEST BANK DURING SPRING BREAK 2014

During the spring break of the Spring 2014 semester (March 14-22), fifteen undergraduates embarked upon a global studies field course trip to Israel, Jordan and the West Bank. The group visited a number of sites in Israel, including Tel Aviv, the Lebanese-Israeli border, the Golan Heights, the Sea of Galilee, the Dead Sea and Jerusalem. The group also visited several sites in Jordan, including the ancient Roman city of Jerash, the capital of Jordan, Amman, and Petra. While visiting Petra, students spent the night in a Bedouin desert camp and took 4×4 jeeps into the Wadi desert. Finally, the group traveled to visit Bethlehem and a Palestinian refugee camp, Aida, in the West Bank. While earning four course credits, students expanded their worlds and made deep and lasting friendships. They returned home as more engaged and committed global citizens.

After returning from the trip, students reflected on their experience:

This trip made me completely more aware of other cultures and people. It was important that I was able to experience real world issues in person rather than just from a textbook. I also believe that this will make me a better future teacher. I am proud of myself for going out of my comfort zone and expanding my horizons.”

I can’t even begin to explain how different I feel because of my experiences there. My entire view of everything that I hear in the news and in school is altered by my time there and I sincerely wish more people could educate themselves through travel. Like Mark Twain said, ‘Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness’ and I definitely agree with that statement now.”

It is difficult  to find the words to describe our overall experience in Israel and Jordan. When I try to do so, I am overwhelmed with so many emotions and then frustration because I know there is no way I can impress upon people the impact of these experiences. Now that we are back home, I feel liberated. I feel empowered.”

Crusader Castle, Akko, Israel

Two students riding a camel outside of the Treasury in Petra, Jordan

 

Group photo at the ancient Roman city, Jerash, in Jordan

Students visiting Aida, a Palestinian refugee camp in the West Bank

 

A student dressed in a traditional Arab headscarf, Jordan

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RECEPTION FOR GRADUATING HISTORY SENIORS AND DEPARTMENTAL AWARDS CEREMONY

On April 30, 2014, the Department of History hosted an annual event celebrating graduation of our seniors and recognizing some outstanding History majors with departmental awards. This year the reception gathered a good number of graduating seniors and their family, faculty members, and office staff. Dean Martin Levin was also in attendance. A full list of student awardees and their photos are available elsewhere on our website so please check them out!

Congratulations to History seniors and best wishes for the future! Congratulations to all the recipients of departmental awards 2014! Go Class 2014!

 

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TWO HISTORY MAJORS RECEIVE LIBRARY RESEARCH AWARDS

Two History majors received this year’s Library Research Awards. Emily Komornik was a winner in the Freshmen/Sophomores category for a paper “Jonathan Edwards: Conversion through Fear.” Her paper was nominated by Professor Caitlin Carenen.

Shannon Williamson was a winner in the Juniors/Seniors category for a paper “Choosing an Ethnic Group to Target: The Case of Jewish Minority in Interwar Poland.” Her paper was nominated by Professor Roland Clark.

Congratulations to Emily and Shannon!

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DR. JAMIE EVES RECEIVES AN EXCELLENCE AWARD

Dr. Jamie Eves has received Eastern’s Excellence Award for teaching in the part-time category. Dr. Eves has taught a variety of courses in American history in the Department of History for close to twenty years. He also currently serves as Executive Director of the Windham Textile and History Museum in Willimantic, where he often supports internships of history majors. Congratulations, Dr. Eves!

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HISTORY CLUB ACTIVITIES

On Saturday April 12th, History Club visited the PEZ Museum in Orange, Connecticut. Shawn Batchelder ’16 (president), Kelly Galligan ’17 (treasurer), Kim Avery ’14, and Elissa MacInnis ’17, were in attendance. The PEZ candy dates back to 1927 and was invented by Austrian Eduard Haas III. PEZ is actually an acronym for the German word for peppermint, “pfefferminz,” which uses the first, middle, and last letters of the word.  The Museum consists of several thematic displays, such as animals, sports, and Batman, a gift shop, and visual access to the factory. The PEZ Museum is a family-friendly activity and it was thoroughly enjoyed by the History Club.

History Club will also be hosting a trivia night on April 22nd with free food and prizes and a fundraiser later this month. The club meets every Tuesday at 3:30pm in the Student Center. For more information, contact us at historyclub@easternct.edu

 

 

 

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HISTORY MAJORS AT THE STUDENT RESEARCH CONFERENCE

Three History majors presented their research at the Eastern Student Research Conference on April 12, 2014.

Zachary Marotte (faculty mentor Dr. Jamel Ostwald) presented his paper “The Persistence of the Ancients: The English Army’s Gradual Adoption of Modern Military Theory, 1660-1728.”

Katherine Buyse (faculty mentor Dr. Caitlin Carenen) presented her paper “Muscular Evangelism: At the Crossroads of Sports, American Fundamentalism and Media.”

Lindsay Witkoski (faculty mentor Caitlin Carenen) presented her paper “Intellectual Origins of 20th Century Domestic Terrorism.”

Congratulations to the presenters and their mentors!

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CHECKING IN WITH OUR EMERITI FACULTY

Supported by a grant from the China and Inner Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies, Dr. Catherine Lynch, emeritus, spent the fall semester of 2013 as visiting scholar at Nanjing University and at Shanghai’s East China Normal University in China. There she began work on her new project to transcribe, edit, and annotate a series of interviews she conducted over two weeks in 1980 with the prominent thinker and social activist, Liang Shuming (1893-1988). Before returning to Connecticut, Lynch signed a book contract to publish the interviews in Chinese with the Guangxi Normal University Press, one of the top academic presses in China.

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HISTORY MAJOR MILES WILKERSON PRESENTS AT THE PHI ALPHA THETA CONFERENCE

Miles Wilkerson presented his research paper at the Phi Alpha Theta NY Upper Regional Meeting at SUNY College at Oneonta on April 12, 2014. Miles’ paper is entitled “Nunca Olvide: Reframing the History of Cuban Exile Terrorism,” and his faculty mentor is Dr. Joan Meznar. The abstract of the paper reads: “Noting the alarming lack of English-language scholarship on the subject, this paper tackles the difficult issue of CIA-sponsored terrorism against Cuba. It raises the question: how did gusano terrorism affect political discourse and civil rights in Cuba? This article examines the historiography of Cuban-exile terrorism in the Hemisphere between 1959 and 1976, exploring the ways in which the Cuban government responded to this terror and how it affected Cuba’s citizens. It also investigates the evolution of Luis Posada Carriles, the “Bin Laden of Latin America”, and Orlando Bosch, two of the most active terrorists in twentieth century history. The author dissects numerous primary and secondary sources to prove this thesis, including declassified United States government documents, speeches by Fidel Castro, scholarly journal articles, and interviews with the victims of Cuban exile terrorism. In addition, the paper constructs a critical history of Cuban antiterrorism law in the style of Michel Foucault’s Discipline and Punish. This is done in order to better understand how Cuba’s government reacted to the terror attacks of Bosch, Posada and other CIA-backed terrorists. By analyzing the historical discourse surrounding this controversial topic, the author intends to clarify the power relationships that make up exile terrorism against the island nation of Cuba.”   Congratulations, Miles!

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CONGRATULATIONS TO DR. CAITLIN CARENEN

CONGRATULATIONS to Dr. Caitlin Carenen for winning the Board of Trustees University Level Award for Research! In her letter President Nunez wrote to Dr. Carenen: “By blending your research and teaching, you model the ideal professor for a primary undergraduate liberal arts university.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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