PROFESSOR RICHARD CRANE REMEMBERS HIS YEARS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AT EASTERN

Professor Richard Crane, Benedictine College, Atchison, KS, has shared with us some memories of his years at Eastern, and highlights from his academic career. In an email to Professor Ann Higginbotham he wrote:

“I graduated from Eastern with a BA in History in May 1986. My professors all challenged and inspired me: Thomas Anderson was a master storyteller as well as prodigious scholar; Robert Christensen instilled in me a love for the history of ideas; Lee Langley heightened my appreciation for interdisciplinary research; and Ann Higginbotham, who was a new member of the History Department, broadened my horizons to include social and women’s history.

Thanks in large part to the encouragement of these faculty members, I pursued graduate studies in Modern European History at the University of Connecticut, earning my master’s in May 1987 and receiving the doctorate in August 1994. After a couple of visiting professorships, I joined the faculty at Greensboro College in North Carolina, where I spent sixteen years, most of this time chairing the department and teaching in both the History and Honors programs. In August 2013, I started a new job as Professor of History at Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas.

Like the faculty members who taught me at ECSU, undergraduate teaching is my main focus, and my students’ intellectual growth is my greatest joy as a professor. But I have also tried to stay active as a historian, publishing articles and book reviews in The Catholic Historical Review, Studies in Christian-Jewish Relations, Patterns of Prejudice, The Journal of Church and State, Theological Studies, and other journals. I have also authored two books: A French Conscience in Prague: Louis Eugene Faucher and the Abandonment of Czechoslovakia (1996), and Passion of Israel: Jacques Maritain, Catholic Conscience, and the Holocaust (2010/2014). The latter book was written while I was a visiting fellow at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC.”

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